Garden Fencing

Secure Your Home with Driveway Gates

Posted on March 28, 2017 at 1:31 pm

Buying a house is a lifetime investment. We only plan to buy it once unless we have plans to buy and sell or rent other properties as property prices go up and down. Whatever the reason you are buying a property, protecting your property that you have earned with sweat and years of hard work is the first thing you should do. After all, every single penny that we save to own our own personal space is worth a million dollars. We can secure our property by buying an insurance policy against fire, or other natural calamities. As predicting or controlling the fury of nature is not in our hands, at least we can protect our house from intruders by installing quality driveway gates. (more…)

Posted in Garden Fencing

Installing Garden Gates Liverpool: Here are the Top 5 Considerations

Posted on August 3, 2016 at 1:09 pm

Whether it is about your privacy, making the home blend in with the neighbourhood, or just enhancing the aesthetics of the home, there are several factors that a homeowner needs to consider when choosing a garden gate.

The following are the top five considerations:

  1. Opening the Gate

The gate can swing either outwards toward the street or inwards towards the home. Alternatively, it could slide either to the right or to the left of the boundary wall. The most critical thing in determining how the gate will open is the slope of the driveway and curvature of the wall. A swinging gate would not work efficiently in an upward sloping surface if it opens towards the up-slope. Pedestrians and motor vehicle traffic are important aspects to consider when considering an outward swinging garden gate as these gates may block the pavement. A curved boundary wall cannot be used with a sliding garden gate as it may get stuck.

  1. Style of the Gate

Residential estates may have certain requirements or restrictions on types of gates that may be used. For instance, garden gates Liverpool may have to adhere to a certain standard of construction according to neighbourhood or street. However, that is not all the homeowner needs to think about. Matching the gate with the house’s style can do a lot to improve the aesthetics of your home. Townhouses and grand old residences look good with aluminium or tubular steel gates that come with ornate Classique or Gothic tops.

  1. Gate Colour

The colour of the gate, style, and material your gate is made of, is the first impression visitors and passers-by will get about the home. Painting the gate an attractive colour serves to enhance garden aesthetics while showcasing the owners personality. Besides, Aluminium Garden gates Liverpool can be made more durable through powder coating which could add years of use to the gate.

  1. Accessing the Home

Depending on the privacy or level of security required, there may be several options on using the gate.

  1. a) Manual Access: Opening the gate by hand is one of the oldest and simplest ways to get into your home. However, it can be quite inconvenient since it requires either a key, a code, or padlock. These would call for special arrangements or wait times when the household is entertaining guests, people are in a rush, or are dealing with bad weather.
  2. b) Remote Control Access: Easy to open the gate particularly when approaching an outward swinging gate in a vehicle. Depending on settings, it may be possible to allow guests into the property without needing to go out to let them in.
  3. c) Intercom Access: Coming with a security camera, the intercom is one of the safest ways of access that allows for the utmost levels of security and privacy.
  4. Powering the Gate

Unless the owner goes for manual gates, there is a need to determine how the gate will be powered. The easiest solution is running electrical cables from the house to the driveway. Alternatively, they can go for solar powered gates, which not only save them money, but are also eco-friendly. Moreover, the inconvenience of being locked out of the home during a power outage, or the risk of underground cables being cut, is eliminated in one stroke.

Posted in Garden Fencing, Gardens

Putting up fence panels, and dealing with fence posts.

Posted on December 18, 2015 at 10:55 pm

Putting up new fence panels in your garden is no easy task; you first have to check who owns the fence you’re taking down, as in the land the fence is on, or the land the new fence is to be built on. The land could belong to you or your neighbour; if the land belongs to your neighbour, it is generally their responsibility to put a new one up, or if there is no fence, then you can put one up on the boundaries of the land on your side.

If the boundary line for the fence is on your side then it’s ok to put up the new fence; you may have to take down the old fence if one existed, and if one did exists previously, you need to check whether the old posts are concrete metal, or wood, and ascertain whether they can still be used with your new fence.

With wooden posts, the wood may be rotten and the remnants of the fence posts will need to be dug up, and then removed; if not rotten, it might still be best to take them up anyway.

With metal posts, the metal may have become twisted and warped, or even rusty and would have been fixed into place with a concrete base; they will be difficult to remove, but with a bit of smashing, digging and jiggling you can get them out.

With concrete posts, they are most likely going to be in good shape, and may still be usable if the fence panels are for a shorter fence which can be seen over. If you’re looking to build a higher fence, and thinner panels, you won’t be able to fix the panels to the posts and they will need to be removed; the way to get them out of the ground is similar to how you get the metal posts out, but it will require two people to do this and carry the posts away safely, as they can be quite heavy to lift.

Alternatively if the posts are half way on the neighbours side of the land, and they don’t mind, you can get away with leaving the concrete posts where they are, and then drilling three holes into each of them and using coach bolts to fix wooden posts against them, that are flush to the ground; the problem with this is that you have to check whether the old post fence line is level and straight with the garden, otherwise you’re going to have to improvise and find a feasible work around, as well as re-level the garden, so the panels line up level on the top when fixed in place to the posts.

As a side note for the concrete posts option, if you left the posts in and fixed the wooden posts in front of them with coach bolts, and the new fence is up and looks awesome on your side, then you may encounter problems with the neighbours who are suddenly not ok with how the fence looks on their side. In this case you can either ignore them or talk nicely about building a raised wooden flowerbed on their side of the fence, flush against the fence that contrasts nicely with the concrete posts; this is always a good thing to do to keep the peace with annoying neighbours when building fences.

If you have to put new posts in, and the old posts have to come up because the new panels are longer, then you will have to be aware of tree and shrub roots, as well as rocks and even the lumps of concrete left over from the old posts if one of them lines up where one of the new posts has to go; some people even have power cables running from the house side of the garden to the shed, and you will have to watch out for them too (if in doubt check if there is any power in the shed such as a light or a power socket and follow the cable down and move it out of the way carefully).

Posted in Garden Fencing

A Picket Fence for your Front Garden

Posted on January 23, 2014 at 1:34 pm

Picket fences can be traditional, smart looking fences, and they’re extremely well suited for front gardens. Having a fence to enclose your front garden gives you a lot more safety and security, which is ideal if your house is situated on a corner, meaning individuals won’t cut over the corner of your front garden.

Picket fences are often finished in white paint (in America) and this look can work extremely well for cottages, perhaps the type with a white exterior and a thatched roof. Traditional picket fences tend to be relatively low, and they’ll have a matching gate to give access.

If you want to shut off your garden with a cheap and popular method, then consider a picket fence. It can be finished to the colour of your liking, and it can close off your property, stopping people and their pets passing over your front garden.

Posted in Garden Fencing